1 year ago

Fitnah - Movement for Women’s Liberation

Fitnah

We establish Fitnah - Movement for Women’s Liberation, a protest movement demanding freedom, equality, and secularism and calling for an end to misogynist cultural, religious and moral laws and customs, compulsory veiling, sex apartheid, sex trafficking, and violence against women.

We remind the Islamic regime of Iran and Islamists everywhere that the women’s liberation movement is a source of fitnah for their rule alone.
We are Islamism’s worst fitnah!

To join Fitnah – Movement for Women’s Liberation, visit here.

Click ‘like’ on our Facebook page.

Email: fitnah.movement@gmail.com
Blog: http://fitnahmovement.blogspot.co.uk/
Website: www.fitnah.org/ (under construction)

1 year ago

The Most Post-Christian Cities In The USA

Post Judeo-Christian

The most post-Christian cities in the USA | #tourism #irreligiosity | Source: cities.barna.org/… See also www.barna.org/…

1 year ago

36 note(s)

Reblogged From:
atheistrepublic
High Quality
Stifyn Emrys on the most dangerous aspects of religion

Stifyn Emrys on the most dangerous aspects of religion

1 year ago

26 note(s)

Reblogged From:
atheistrepublic
High Quality
atheistrepublic:


“Any system of religion that has anything in it that shocks the mind of a child, cannot be a true system.” - Thomas Paine

atheistrepublic:

“Any system of religion that has anything in it that shocks the mind of a child, cannot be a true system.” - Thomas Paine

1 year ago

14 note(s)

Reblogged From:
atheistrepublic
High Quality
atheistrepublic:

“Religion is based primarily upon fear. It is partly the terror of the unknown and partly as the wish to feel that you have a kind of elder brother who will stand by you in all your troubles and disputes. Fear of the mysterious, fear of defeat, fear of death. Fear is the parent of cruelty, and therefore it is no wonder if cruelty and religion have gone hand in hand. It is because fear is at the basis of those two things. In this world we can now begin a little to understand things, and a little to master them by help of science, which has forced its way step by step against the opposition of all the old precepts. Science can help us to get over this craven fear in which mankind has lived for so many generations. Science can teach us, and I think our own hearts can teach us, no longer to look around for imaginary supports, no longer to invent allies in the sky, but rather to look to our own efforts here below to make this world a fit place to live in, instead of the place that the churches in all these centuries have made it.” ~ Bertrand Russell

atheistrepublic:

“Religion is based primarily upon fear. It is partly the terror of the unknown and partly as the wish to feel that you have a kind of elder brother who will stand by you in all your troubles and disputes. Fear of the mysterious, fear of defeat, fear of death. Fear is the parent of cruelty, and therefore it is no wonder if cruelty and religion have gone hand in hand. It is because fear is at the basis of those two things. In this world we can now begin a little to understand things, and a little to master them by help of science, which has forced its way step by step against the opposition of all the old precepts. Science can help us to get over this craven fear in which mankind has lived for so many generations. Science can teach us, and I think our own hearts can teach us, no longer to look around for imaginary supports, no longer to invent allies in the sky, but rather to look to our own efforts here below to make this world a fit place to live in, instead of the place that the churches in all these centuries have made it.” ~ Bertrand Russell

1 year ago

24 note(s)

Reblogged From:
sorayachemaly
High Quality
atheistrepublic:

Why are some atheists so angry? (Greta Christina)

atheistrepublic:

Why are some atheists so angry? (Greta Christina)

1 year ago

Religion: The Bad Parent

TheraminTrees presents his fundamental problem with religion …. the Parent-Child relationship gone bad.

1 year ago

[Christopher Hitchens] There are a lot of people who simply don’t believe that a NATO country or a capitalist country can be a moral agent at all. After all, “If they cared, why wouldn’t they care about Tibet, Rwanda, Palestine, …” Yeah. We’ve heard all that.

[Heckler] It’s imperialism…

[Christopher Hitchens] Believe me. Look, I can make that case… In fact, I have made that case in my sleep. You do not have to be awake to make it, after all. “Since we can’t do everything, why don’t we do nothing?” Right? “Since we didn’t help the Rwandans and no one in the peace movement said we should militarily, why should we help Kosovo?” Live with that, if you can. But, don’t f***ing call me an imperialist for pointing it out. 

      - Hitch Hike Documentary [2000] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRw2X3Yg8LA#

1 year ago

14 note(s)

High Quality
Religion may not survive the Internet

A well researched, information-rich landmark article: Religion may not survive the Internet (Image: Grumpy Cat http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/grumpy-cat says NO to god and his clique)
Religion may not survive the Internet

A well researched, information-rich landmark article: Religion may not survive the Internet (Image: Grumpy Cat http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/grumpy-cat says NO to god and his clique)

(Source: s167.beta.photobucket.com)

1 year ago

1 note(s)

High Quality
Stephen King on the beauty of the mystery that allows us to live sane in an insanely dangerous and challenging world:


I ask you to consider the fact that we live in a web of mystery, and have simply gotten so used to the fact that we have crossed out the word and replaced it with one we like better, that one being reality. Where do we come from? Where were we before we were here? Don’t know. Where are we going? Don’t know. A lot of churches have what they assure us are the answers, but most of us have a sneaking suspicion all that might be a con-job laid down to fill the collection plates. In the meantime, we’re in a kind of compulsory dodgeball game as we free-fall from Wherever to Ain’t Got a Clue. Sometimes bombs go off and sometimes the planes land okay and sometimes the blood tests come back clean and sometimes the biopsies come back positive. Most times the bad telephone call doesn’t come in the middle of the night but sometimes it does, and either way we know we’re going to drive pedal-to-the-metal into the mystery eventually.
It’s crazy to be able to live with that and stay sane, but it’s also beautiful. I write to find out what I think, and what I found out writing The Colorado Kid was that maybe — I say just maybe — it’s the beauty of the mystery that allows us to live sane as we pilot our fragile bodies through this demolition-derby world. We always want to reach for the lights in the sky, and we always want to know where the Colorado Kid (the world is full of Colorado Kids) came from. Wanting might be better than knowing. I don’t say that for sure; I only suggest it.
— Stephen King, from the afterword to The Colorado Kid (2005)

Stephen King on the beauty of the mystery that allows us to live sane in an insanely dangerous and challenging world:

I ask you to consider the fact that we live in a web of mystery, and have simply gotten so used to the fact that we have crossed out the word and replaced it with one we like better, that one being reality. Where do we come from? Where were we before we were here? Don’t know. Where are we going? Don’t know. A lot of churches have what they assure us are the answers, but most of us have a sneaking suspicion all that might be a con-job laid down to fill the collection plates. In the meantime, we’re in a kind of compulsory dodgeball game as we free-fall from Wherever to Ain’t Got a Clue. Sometimes bombs go off and sometimes the planes land okay and sometimes the blood tests come back clean and sometimes the biopsies come back positive. Most times the bad telephone call doesn’t come in the middle of the night but sometimes it does, and either way we know we’re going to drive pedal-to-the-metal into the mystery eventually.

It’s crazy to be able to live with that and stay sane, but it’s also beautiful. I write to find out what I think, and what I found out writing The Colorado Kid was that maybe — I say just maybe — it’s the beauty of the mystery that allows us to live sane as we pilot our fragile bodies through this demolition-derby world. We always want to reach for the lights in the sky, and we always want to know where the Colorado Kid (the world is full of Colorado Kids) came from. Wanting might be better than knowing. I don’t say that for sure; I only suggest it.

— Stephen King, from the afterword to The Colorado Kid (2005)